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WKU SFI FAQ

 

Where do I go when I arrive?

Registration takes place at the dormitory, Zacharias Hall. Its location can be found at the following URL as building number 26 (bottom left): campus map. Information on the dorm can be found at the following: Zacharias Hall official page

Students staying on campus should arrive on Saturday 7 July, between noon and 4:00 pm CST at the dorm. Day campers (commuters) will need to be at orientation on Saturday at 6:00 PM, at the Downing Student Union auditorium.

How should commuters arrive and leave each day?

Commuters should arrive each morning for the 8:30 AM warm-ups in the Garrett Conference Center ballroom. They should also be picked up each evening at Zacharias Hall at 8:30 PM. On the first day of camp, the 7th, commuters should arrive at the Downing Student Union auditorium at 6:00 PM. On the last day, the 15th, commuters should be picked up at the Downing Student Union auditorium at 10:30 AM.

When do I leave camp?

All resident students must be out of the dorm by 12:00pm CST on Sunday, the 15th. WKU Forensics assumes no responsibility for students on campus after that time.

What sorts of items should I pack?

Pack enough clothing for the entire nine days, all toiletries plus sheets, pillow, blanket, towels, washcloths, alarm clock (if needed) and flip flops for the showers. Bring an umbrella in case of rain and a light jacket for cool buildings. All students should bring paper for taking notes and a black interp book for those events requiring one (like duo, prose, POI, and poetry). Also, you may wish to bring athletic shoes and a swimsuit for exercise and swim breaks later in the week.

Do I need to bring a suit?

No. Please dress casually all week, though all campers are expected to dress appropriately at all times. If any staff member feels as though a camper is wearing inappropriate clothing, the camper will be asked to go change immediately. Note that you *may* wish to bring swimwear, as there will be an evening or two of play in the athletic center, which includes a pool.

What bed size sheets do I need?

All dorms on WKU’s campus take Twin XL sheets.

What happens if I lose my food card or key?

You will only be issued one food card, so hang onto it! If you lose your key, it costs $25.00 to replace it.

Do I need to bring my own material?

While a few students come to camp with selections already, most do not. We teach from the ground up. If a camper brings either a topic for Oratory or a selection of literature for Interpretation (rather than choosing one from our library at camp) we may advise the camper to switch to a different topic/selection after consideration. Note that if you do bring your own topic or scripts, we will not guarantee that we will coach it; we feel it unethical to charge you money to coach you in some speech or interp that we feel is either offensive or not effectively competitive. IMPORTANT: All senior high interp students will be required to perform on Saturday evening in order to place students in labs (to help the counselors get to know you). Students may perform one minute from any selection they have previously performed or just talk about what they’ve done so far this summer.

May I keep prescription medication in my room?

You may keep all prescription and non-prescription medication in your room, but you must have a medical release form filled out by a parent/guardian. Please note there are no refrigerators in the dorm, so if you need one (e.g.: to store insulin) you must ask us in advance.

May I use tobacco products?

You may, though we must have signed permission from your parents, even if you are of age to use tobacco.

Will I need to bring extra money?

Resident campers pre-pay for all meals and dorms, so they will not need cash. Commuters who plan to eat lunch or dinner with everyone else on campus, however, would need to bring cash to eat in the cafeteria. Additionally, some students choose to bring extra money for snacks from the vending machines, to order pizzas in the evenings, or to purchase souvenirs from the bookstore.

May I drive my own car?

You may, but all students that drive will be required to turn their keys in to the camp director at registration. You will not receive your keys again until the last day of camp.

Will there be counselors in the dorms?

Yes, there will be multiple counselors staying in the dorms all week long. If you need anything, ask them.

Are the dorms safe?

Yes, all dorms are locked 24 hours/day and can only be accessed with your room key.

Am I allowed to leave campus?

No. No camper is allowed to leave campus at any time, unless he or she leaves with a parent or guardian, and has made arrangements ahead of time with the camp director.

Am I allowed to be on campus by myself?

No. While WKU and the city of Bowling Green are very safe, no student should be on any part of campus without a counselor.

May I have visitors?

Yes. Your parents and immediate family are welcome to visit at any time during the week, but please let the camp director and your counselor(s) know in advance so we can expect them.

Shuttle service between Bowling Green and the Nashville airport?

We use either of two services:
Bowling Green Shuttle | reservations@bgshuttle.com | 270-781-4321
Key Transportation | keytransportshuttle@juno.com | 615-374-2027
Note to those flying alone, these do not provide full escort services. You might wish to ask your airline what extra security services they are willing to provide.

What are these events?

We teach forensics events in our classes, and you’ll choose one for your time with us. Below are full event descriptions from the National Speech and Debate Association and from the Kentucky High School Speech League (where needed).

 

Humorous Interpretation – Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. Humorous Interpretation is designed to test a student’s comedic skills through script analysis, delivery, timing, and character development. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and author.

Dramatic Interpretation – Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. With a spotlight on character development and depth, Dramatic Interpretation focuses on a student’s ability to convey emotion through the use of a dramatic text. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances may also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and author.

Duo Interpretation – Two competitors team up to deliver a ten-minute performance of a published play or story. Using off-stage focus, competitors convey emotion and environment through a variety of performance techniques focusing on the relationships and interactions between the characters. No props or costumes are used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the students to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.

Original Oratory – Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, competitors craft an argument using evidence, logic, and emotional appeals. Topics range widely, and can be informative or persuasive in nature. The speech is delivered from memory.

Extemporaneous Speaking – Note that junior high students will only do domestic extemp. Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to international or domestic current events and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the Internet during preparation. In FX, topics range from country-specific issues to regional concerns to foreign policy. In DX, topics range from political matters to economic concerns to U.S. foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.

Public Forum Debate – Public Forum involves opposing teams of two, debating a topic concerning a current event. Proceeding a coin toss, the winners choose which side to debate (PRO or CON) or which speaker position they prefer (1st or 2nd), and the other team receives the remaining option. Students present cases, engage in rebuttal and refutation, and also participate in a “crossfire” (similar to a cross examination) with the opportunity to question the opposing team. Often times community members are recruited to judge this event.

Informative Speaking – Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, Informative Speaking competitors craft a speech using evidence, logic, and optional visual aids. All topics must be informative in nature; the goal is to educate, not to advocate. The speech is delivered from memory.

Congressional Debate – We do not teach this event at our camp. Students interested in Student Congress should sign up for either Extemporaneous Speaking or Public Forum debate. We feel these are of far greater educational value, and Extemp already teaches both current events and extemporaneous style speaking.

Poetry Interpretation – Using a selection or selections of literature, students provide an oral interpretation of poetry. Poetry is characterized by writing that conveys ideas, experiences, and emotions through language and expression. Students may choose traditional poetry, often characterized by rhyme or rhythm, or nontraditional poetry, which often has a rhythmic flow but is not necessarily structured by formal meter (meter is a beat, pattern, or structure, such as iambic pentameter). Students may not use prose, nor drama (plays) in this category. This event is seven minutes at NSDA and 10 minutes at KHSSL, including an introduction.

Programmed Oral Interp – Using a combination of Prose, Poetry and Drama, students construct a program up to ten minutes in length using at least two out of the three genres. With a spotlight on argumentation and performative range, Program Oral Interpretation focuses on a student’s ability to combine multiple genres of literature centered around a single theme. Competitors are expected to portray multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used except for the manuscript. Performances also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the titles and authors used in the program.

Prose Interpretation – Using a short story, parts of a novel, or other published work of prose, students provide an oral interpretation of a selection of materials. Typically a single piece of literature, prose can be drawn from works of fiction or non-fiction. Prose corresponds to common speech patterns and may combine elements of narration and dialogue. Students may not use poetry, or drama (plays), in this category. This event is seven minutes at NSDA and 10 minutes at KHSSL, including an introduction.

Storytelling – Each student recreates and retells a story for the purpose of entertaining the audience. Either a complete story or an excerpt from a longer one may be used, and the story may be either humorous or serious. The story must be memorized, and the storyteller may sit on the floor (not in a chair) stand, or use a limited stage area to tell the story. The use of costumes, props, or furniture of any kind is prohibited. The maximum time is ten minutes including required introduction.

Declamation – Each competitor delivers a speech which was written by another person, presented in a public forum by a person other than the contestant, and taken from a published source. The speech must be memorized, and a lectern shall not be used. The maximum time is ten minutes, including a required introduction.

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